Tattoos

The Truth About Tattoo Removal And Cover Ups

The Truth About Tattoo Removal And Cover Ups

When you walk into your tattoo shop, chances are you aren’t thinking about possibly getting it removed later. In contrast, it is always a great idea to think about what tattoo you’re getting and why long before, not all people take this approach to collecting tattoos.

From an ex’s name to a botch job that you didn’t want to pay full price for, there are many different reasons that people may begin to think about getting either tattoo removal or having their old ink covered up. But, what are some things you may want to think about before deciding which option is best for you? Well, let’s cover some of those must-know myths and truths about tattoo removal and cover-ups. 


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First and foremost, many people think that there’s just one type of laser used for tattoo removal. That isn’t the case. There are many different FDA approved lasers used for the safe and effective removal of tattoos. However, tattoo removal isn’t always exact. It can take up to 5 different laser wavelengths to remove a tattoo, and even then, it isn’t guaranteed to be removed 100%. Pigments such as red tones are challenging to break up with a laser. You may be left with some residual color.

Removal creams used for fading tattoos are a trend that doesn’t work. Remember, your tattoo artist injected the ink beneath your skin during the tattoo process through the use of needles. No topical cream will give you the results that you’re looking for. It may seem like a cheap alternative, but you may be dishing out far more money trying that ‘miracle’ cream. 


Artist: Pit fun fun[/caption]

While tattoo removal is definitely appealing to those who may not want to have to endure another tattoo, remember, tattoo removal is just as painful as the original experience (and in some cases, more painful), So if you’re still in love with the idea of getting more ink, a cover-up may be a much better route for you to go.

Keep in mind is that your cover-up tattoo will usually have to be at least 40 to 50% larger than the original tattoo for the best results. This may seem a little excessive to you, but it allows the artist the room they need to find the perfect position to hide the original tattoo within the cover-up. 


Artist: Pit fun fun[/caption]

Typically, darker colors will cover up the original tattoo, or shading will be used to camouflage the design. However, some very skilled artists can cover up an old tattoo with vibrant colors with a little pre-planning in advance.

Your artist will more than likely either take a picture of your existing tattoo or design the drawing around it, or they may make a mock-up of your existing tattoo so they can overlay the new design during their sketching process. No cover-up will be done within minutes of a walk-in. Your artist may even ask for a day or two to think of ways to best plan their attack on your old ink.


Artist: Pit fun fun[/caption]

The lighter your original tattoo is, the better your cover-up will be. If you have a solid black tattoo, chances are your artist may send you off to get it lightened before they even touch the cover-up. The reason for this is because they want you to have the best possible results. Make sure you follow your artist’s suggestions. They will always keep you informed throughout the entirety of your cover-up, keeping you in the know about what to expect.

Lastly, you need to have realistic expectations. If you came in with a tattoo that is dark and blown out, you might still be able to see parts of the old design through the cover-up. While most will be masked with the new ink, it can be impossible in some cases to cover everything solidly. Allow your artist some artistic license to give you the best possible results.